Win one, lose one in social media libel ruling by the Supreme Court

The Supreme Court has made two important rulings covering twitter, Facebook and libel.  They affect how large a group of viewers needs to be and what words mean on twitter.  One is good for the claimant: the other is good for the defence. A woman published a tweet to her ex-husband’s new partner that he Read More

Fragmented libel blocks documentary on Scientology from the UK screens

The fragmented state of libel laws in the UK means you will not be able to see a US-made documentary about the Church of Scientology. English and Welsh libel was reformed in 2013. The hurdles for the claimant were raised and the defences strengthened. Northern Ireland has the old libel But Northern Ireland kept the Read More

A UK internet troll seriously damaged the reputation of a US lawyer, the High Court decided yesterday. Jason Page put a false review on Google maps about the Colorado lawyer Timothy Bussey, the Court decided. Under the new law Page now faces a £100,000 bill after losing the case. It is one of the first Read More

Specsavers should have gone to ContentETC to save it a libel action

Kevin Pietersen has won a libel action against an advert.  It suggested that he had tampered with his cricket bat to fool the Hot Spot technology cricket now uses.  It was run by Specsavers. His lawyer rightly said after: the intention of the content or its creators is irrelevant.  It’s the impact that counts. All Read More

ContentETC briefing prompts campaign to reform libel in Nigeria

A leading Nigerian media company plans to launch a campaign in Nigeria to reform Nigeria’s libel laws.  Media Trust, a newspaper, internet and magazine publisher in the Nigerian capital, plans to lobby other publishers and journalists to mount this campaign.  The aim is to reform the complicated libel laws to win more freedom of speech. Read More