Musk wins US libel case with good arguments about social media

Elon Musk’s US lawyers used some interesting arguments to defend their client from the accusation of libel.  Musk used the term “pedo guy” in a Tweet after Vernon Unsworth had turned down an offer by Musk to build a submarine to save the trapped Thai football team. Musk did not name Unsworth but Unsworth claimed

Stokes story shows BBC needs to train presenters in privacy law

    The Ben Stokes “news story” has revealed a gross lack of understanding of the privacy laws by the BBC Radio 4 presenter of the afternoon news program PM, Evan Davis.  Her should really know better given the rising importance of this law. The BBC decided not to give the details splashed over the

Opening up the copyright debate again

CC Greyweed https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ unchanged You might have thought that the mighty Viacom versus YouTube case had settled all of the main issues about sharing platforms and copyright. YouTube won the 2007 case with the defence that it was an innocent platform that took down any infringing material when it was notified on it. This cleared the legal way for

ContentETC briefing prompts campaign to reform libel in Nigeria

A leading Nigerian media company plans to launch a campaign in Nigeria to reform Nigeria’s libel laws.  Media Trust, a newspaper, internet and magazine publisher in the Nigerian capital, plans to lobby other publishers and journalists to mount this campaign.  The aim is to reform the complicated libel laws to win more freedom of speech.

May right to raise threat of law to underpin independent press regulation post Leveson

Teresa May is right to say the government would introduce legislation to underpin an independent regulation of the press if the press itself does not come up with a suitable plan, and soon. That’s a good negotiating tactic. Her legions of critics will say: “But it’s not Government policy, listen to the PM.” But there

10 things Leveson must not fluff this Thursday

Ten things Leveson must not fluff 1                     Regulation must have legal backing: we can’t have the publishers opting out. 2                     Editors and publishers, including owners, should have responsibility for what their employees do, as in corporate manslaughter. 3                     Newspapers need to establishe internal compliance operations to implement a newly written code. 4                     Clarify what is

US Congress moves against “pirates”: Wikipedia protests

The US Congress is taking ”piracy” of US intellectual property seriously by proposing to attack the financial basis of foreign sites running copyright material without permission.  Two acts are in Congress to let media owners force search engines to stop linking to “pirate” sites and stop US advertisers advertising. Wikipedia offline in protest The opposition